Technology: Microsoft Office

LX Accessible Content Practices

Published by LX Team |

Some students might experience barriers when accessing content in your subject. Adding content to your subject sites and learning materials in a certain way can help remove these barriers and create an inclusive and accessible learning environment. We asked our Digital Accessibility Ambassadors – UTS students with lived experience of...

Content structure: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

A clear and logical structure is a basic foundation of accessible digital content. Structure refers to the layout and format of your content. Well-structured content benefits all of your students and is critical for students who have cognitive or learning disabilities, students who use screen readers, students who only...

Language: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

Ensuring that you use clear language in your subject is important for all students – and critical for some who might find it harder to fill in the gaps. We asked our Digital Accessibility Ambassadors – UTS students with lived experience of disability about why using clear language in your...

Alternative text: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

Alternative text, or “alt text” is a short description or tag added to images found online or in documents. It’s a way of describing images for people who are unable to see them, usually because they have a vision-related disability. It’s generally not visible on the page like a...

Captions and transcripts: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

Both transcripts and captions are ways of reproducing audio content as text. Not only are they essential for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, but they’re also extremely helpful for other students who benefit from having a text version of the content, such as students who speak...

Links: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

A link refers to any section of text that can be clicked on to view other web pages, download documents or access external applications. It’s important that links are added clearly, so students can find them and know what to expect once they select the link. We asked our...

Colour: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

Colour needs to be used mindfully in your subject as it can create barriers for some students. If there’s not enough contrast between the text and the background – some students might not be able to see the content. If it’s used as the only means to convey meaning –...

Templates (not tables): accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

Avoid using tables to structure or format your content, and only use them when presenting data. You should also always aim to create your tables with the platform you’re using, rather than copying and pasting. So if you’re using Canvas, create the table using the Rich Content Editor. If...

Canvas Accessibility Checker: accessible practice

Published by LX Team |

The Canvas Accessibility Checker is a great inbuilt tool that will scan your page and produce a report pointing out different types of accessibility problems and prompt you to fix them. Like any automated accessibility checker, it will not pick up on all issues, it is a useful way...

Collaborative note-taking

Published by LX Team |

How to do this  Set up the collaborative document for students to take notes in, which could be an online Word document or Canvas page. Divide students into small groups. Groups should consist of three to four students to increase opportunities for learning from each other’s note-taking skills. You can assign students...

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