• Tuesday, 27 July 2021
    1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
  • Zoom – further details provided upon registration

Hot Topic Theme: Feedback and Assessment

Despite the importance of feedback, research suggests that traditional feedback practices have often failed to improve student outcomes. Recently there has been a reconceptualization of feedback and a call for a re-examination of the way feedback practices are enacted to enable feedback uptake. 

In this workshop, Dr Peter Grainger shares preliminary research findings related to recent frameworks that purport to enable feedback uptake. Specifically, he will look at concepts such as:

  • assessment for learning
  • feedback literacy
  • feedback loops
  • connectedness
  • assessment design
  • peer assessment/collaboration
  • staged assessment, and
  • student agency

Preliminary findings indicate that feedback uptake, leading to enhanced student assessment outcomes, is enhanced by a connected assessment design and a conducive learning environment characterised by ample opportunities for peer collaboration on assessment activities in tutorials. This focus is driven by a desire to design assessment to ensure feedback, which is by definition formative in nature, is noticed, processed, engaged with reflected on and importantly, evidenced by students in subsequent assessment products to improve assessment outcomes. 

Recommended pre-reading

Grainger, P. (2015). How do pre service teacher education students respond to assessment feedback? Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2015.1096322 

Guest Speaker

Dr Peter Grainger, University of the Sunshine Coast, has published regularly on various assessment focused issues including grading tools, moderation, feedback and peer review processes regularly over the past 13 years, evidenced by over 30 peer reviewed publications in quality journals and books. A significant recent publication is an edited collection of research based articles by leading assessment experts through the world, entitled Facilitating Student Learning and Engagement in Higher Education Through Assessment Rubrics. Dr Grainger’s recent research focus is on assessment for learning, feedback literacy, feedback loops, connectedness, assessment design, peer assessment/collaboration, staged assessment, and student agency.

More upcoming sessions:

Wednesday 28 July

Owning the rubric: Co-constructing assessment rubrics with students | 28 July

Wednesday 11 August

Co-constructing rubrics with your students: An experience from Alison McEwen | 11 August

 

What are Hot Topics?

Hot Topics are curriculum and teaching themes that have emerged in UTS from student learning experiences, student feedback surveys (SFS), consultations and other strategic projects. They are a series of professional development and engagement opportunities to enhance courses and provide longer-term support through community building and sustained critical dialogues.

This event is facilitated by the Institute for Interactive Media and Learning (IML) Teaching and Curriculum (TAC) Team.

Alisa Percy is a Senior Lecturer in the IML. As a TAC Team member, She is skilled at facilitating and working with staff and students on educational development programs and projects at all levels of the University to enhance the student learning experience.

You’ll be added into the ‘Hot Topics’ MS Teams space upon registration. You’ll be able to stay connected, view shared resources, favourite papers, blogs and website links.
You can leave the MS team space at anytime or email IML_Ops@uts.edu.au to opt out.

 

Register for this event

Your video, audio and the meeting chat transcript may be recorded or photographed. Please advise the facilitator if you do not wish to be recorded or photographed.

Bookings are closed for this event.

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